What I LOVE about Windows Phone 8.1

If you read my previous article you probably think I really do hate Windows Phone 8.1, but I don’t. In fact, I actually love it. I think it is one of the most compelling mobile operating systems that I have ever used. It’s definitely not without its flaws, but please allow me to tell you why I think more people should give it a chance.

Lock & Start Screen Customization Options

I know I complained about the lack of lock & start screen customization options in my previous post titled “What I HATE about Windows Phone 8.1” However, the customization options that are available with Windows Phone 8.1 (WP8p1) still make me quite happy. I won’t go into great detail about all of the customization options because for the most part they are pretty similar across iOS, Android and WP8p1, but there are a couple that do stand out for me.

I love that I can control exactly which applications display information on my lock screen. I even use an application called “Lock Screen Text” to display my contact information in case my phone is ever lost. I love that I can choose the size and position of the icons on my Start screen. If I wanted to go for a minimalist look I could clear all of the icons and widgets from my Start screen. I know, I know. Android fans are screaming “I’ve been able to do this since *INSERT ANDROID VERSION HERE*.” However, after having been locked into the world of iOS for many years, these are welcome options.

With WP8p1 if you choose not to display any or a few icons on your Start screen you still have quick and easy access to the Start Menu and all of your applications. It’s just a swipe to the right! I actually find the Start menu a better feature than Android’s applications menu. With the Start menu in WP8p1 you can touch a letter to bring up an alphabet that will get you to the application you are looking for quicker. With Android and iOS you sometimes have to scroll through several screens before getting to the application you’re looking for.

A Growing App Store

Believe it or not, you can use WP8p1 as your primary phone. The app store is growing constantly. There are a lot of great applications being developed by people who believe in the platform. I won’t deny that it could be better. There are a lot of mainstream sites and services that desperately need to get on board with an application for WP8p1. In many instances I have found that when there isn’t an app from a product/service that there is usually a third-party application for WP8p1. Not always, but in some cases these third party applications are better than their Android or iOS equivalents that were developed in-house by the product/service. In some cases I have found myself switching to a different service because there isn’t an application available for the product/service. An example of this is Urban Spoon. There used to be a Windows Phone version of Urban Spoon that worked fairly well, but they discontinued development of the application and removed it from the Store. Since then I have been using Yelp and find that I like Yelp a lot better than I ever liked Urban Spoon.

Windows Phone Application on the PC

Connect your WP8p1 device to your PC and you’ll be presented with a great utility for managing the content on your device. My favorite feature was getting the non-DRM’d content from my iTunes library onto my WP8p1 device. The application made it super simple.

Remote Desktop Application

I do a lot of remote computing with the computers on my network. If I’m upstairs and want to initiate a download on the media center PC downstairs I can RDC or VNC into the machine from any computer on the network. Thankfully, Microsoft has included a built-in RDC client into WP8p1. It’s basic, but it gets the job done beautifully. I am very pleased that Microsoft incorporated it. I do wish they would incorporate more business type features. A tool to mount network shares, comes to mind, but I digress (this isn’t the “What I HATE about Windows Phone 8.1” article after-all).

Podcasts

I am thrilled that Microsoft has included a podcast catcher into WP8p1. It even works pretty well. I have it set to download podcasts automatically for me and it actually works. Even better, it will download them automatically to the SD card I have in my phone! Heaven forbid I need more storage than what was provided to me by the manufacturer! This is why I could never use the auto download feature for podcasts on my iPhone. The internal storage was never enough and I didn’t want to pay the Apple tax just for more storage space. Ridiculous.

The app could use some improvements. I don’t know which directory it is searching through for podcasts. Some of the lesser known podcasts that I listen to are not found. Luckily, if you have the link to the RSS feed with enclosures you can use that to subscribe to podcasts.

Stock Applications

While in my previous post I complained about the lack of stock applications that are included with WP8p1, what is included, I do love.

News – When I first started using WP8p1 I assumed that I would need to install all of my favorite news aggregator applications. While I do have them installed, I find myself using the stock news application by default. I rarely go into Flipboard or Converge anymore. The default app is quick and always up to date. My favorite feature is that I can add topics that I am interested in and the application will pull stories based on those topics. My only complaint is that when you click on the topic to view more stories it only pulls down 20 news stories related to that topic. It doesn’t do a continuous scroll like most apps do these days. In some ways this is a good thing. It presents me with the most relevant articles and I’m out of the app faster.

Weather – When I was initially trying to figure out how I wanted to lay out my Start screen, I hated the Weather app. I hated that the live tile rotated through the weather report. After having found a less distracting location for it, I have found the live tile useful. It’s nice not having to go into the application to get the current temperature and the five day forecast. It’s right there on my Start screen. Super convenient. I use it all the time.

Data Sense – Prior to moving to my current Windows Phone I was on an unlimited 3G connection with my iPhone 4. I never worried about how much data I was using. Partially because the data connection was so slow I rarely used it. Now that I am on a metered data plan I needed to be able to see how much data I am using. I love the Data Sense application for this. I can see exactly how much each application is using. I can also tell the application how much data I am allotted each month and it will let me know how much I have left. You can use the Battery Saver application to prevent applications from running in the background to help save your apps from eating your data plan. I do think they could have come up with a better method for limiting each program from using data in the background. I always forget that you have to do it from the Battery Saver application. It seems like this feature would also be useful in the Data Sense application. I understand not wanting to duplicate functionality. I still think there is a better way and I am hopeful it will be addressed with Windows Phone 10.

Reading List – I often find myself looking at my Facebook news feed while I am on break at work. I often come across a long article that I would like to read, but you can only read so much in fifteen minutes. I love the reading list. If I come across an article I want to read later I can save it here. Not only does it bookmark the page for me, I can click a button that strips away the design elements of the website that the article is on (if the website is coded properly), which allows me to focus my attention on just the contents of the article. Since WP8p1 is cloud connected via OneDrive I can view the same articles when I get back to my desktop or laptop computer running Windows 8.1.

Storage Sense – Before moving to my current Windows Phone I made a list of requirements for my next phone. I refused to purchase a phone that did not have user upgradable storage. I didn’t care if that was the only feature that it did not have. I was not going to be locked into an environment that did not allow the user to upgrade their internal storage. Unfortunately, not all Windows Phones support this feature. I’m sure we’re going to see more phones in the future without it. Fortunately, the phone I am using does. Microsoft does a tremendous job of supporting it too. The phone I have is limited to 8 GBs of internal storage, but I can insert a micro-SD card with a capacity up to 128 GBs. Using the Storage Sense application I have new music, videos, podcasts, photos, apps and downloads being downloaded to the SD card instead of the phone’s internal built-in storage. You can also use the Storage Sense application to move most of the pre-installed and system applications over to the SD card. Not all application developers support this feature.

My only complaint about Storage Sense is that you cannot manually scan for errors on your SD card. Over the past few months I have ran into a couple of issues where applications were not loading properly. In the past I have simply rebooted the phone and a message appeared asking me if I wanted to check the card for errors. Running the scan usually repaired the errors and returned my phone to normal operation. I have been running into this issue more often. It requires rebooting the phone several times to resolve. I am thinking a format of the SD card and restoring my apps may be the way to go to resolve the issue. If I find out, I will post a future article.

I mention the above problem that I am having just to alert you that your mileage may vary with running applications off of the SD card. For the most part it works great, but I have definitely encountered issues. When you’re on a device with limited internal storage it is a blessing though.

FM Radio – I rarely use this feature, but I think it’s great to have. In the event that you’re desperate for something to listen to, wanting to listen to local radio stations while you’re traveling or wanting to get weather alerts. I am glad to see it included. Unfortunately, not all Windows Phones have an FM tuner. If yours does I recommend playing with the application. Like all Windows Phone applications it is pretty minimalist. About the only thing you can do is set favorites to stations you frequently listen to. I know it will never happen, but it would be pretty awesome to see a recording feature implemented in future versions. Maybe even a scheduled recording feature. That would be great. I won’t hold my breath though.

Windows Store – One of the best features of the store is the ability to sync your applications across multiple devices. I know you can do this on other platforms so I won’t go into great detail about this feature. It works essentially the same way it does on Android and iOS. When you have multiple devices or are switching to a new device you can have the Windows Store app restore all of the applications you have purchased/downloaded/installed previously. If you ever have to wipe your phone to factory defaults it is a great way to get back up and running again.

Bluetooth Pairing

When I first switched to Windows Phone I had a frustrating time with the Bluetooth pairing in my car. After several updates to WP8p1, Bluetooth pairing has gotten a whole lot better. When I first started using the feature I couldn’t use the forward/back buttons on my car’s steering wheel to reverse to a previous track or progress to the next one. In the beginning there were a lot of instances where the phone would lose its pairing to the car. Sometimes it would take three or more tries to actually get the phone to pair with the car. These frustrations have mostly disappeared after recent updates. I have found in some instances I have more control over the audio on my Windows Phone than I did with my iPhone in the same car.

Although this is the “What I LOVE about Windows Phone 8.1” article, I do want to address a complaint I have with the Bluetooth volume settings. I wish I could get them to stay locked to 100% all the time so I could simply control the volume using my car’s stereo controls. For whatever reason, the phone will occasionally decide to reduce the volume of the audio stream to a faint whisper. When this happens I am forced to switch back over to regular radio or find a place to pull over and fix the issue. It requires unlocking the phone and increasing the volume. Sometimes it requires a full reboot to even get the Bluetooth audio settings back.

Microsoft Office

It is really nice to have Microsoft Office support built-in to the phone. Not only can I view documents, I can edit them, in the application that I created them in. When I switch back to my desktop there is no loss in formatting. Very handy for making sure that resume you’re about to send off is in tip top shape!

Project My Screen

While I could only get this feature to work while I had my phone tethered via a USB cable (I think I need a Miracast dongle for it to work wirelessly). This feature is supposed to work the way AirPlay does for iOS devices and Stream to TV does for Android devices. In addition to the standard uses, I can see many creative uses for this feature from an educational perspective.

Multiple Camera Apps

It can be confusing as to which camera application Microsoft is devoted to as there are several. The Lumia Camera application is great if you require lots of control when taking photos. The standard camera application is great, but does not provide as many advanced features. In addition, there are several feature photo applications. One called Lumia Selfie makes it easy for people who have a phone without a front facing camera to take a selfie. Another Lumia application allows you to create panoramic shots. While I do love that Microsoft provides multiple feature applications for taking photos, I do hope that they will combine the features into one application. Also, I hope they will eventually integrate a decent HDR setting. I miss the HDR feature from my iPhone. I have yet to find a program on Windows Phone that does HDR shots as well as my iPhone 4 did.

Cortana

I love Cortana, when I have a use for her. She works surprisingly well. I am amazed at how well she can understand me. She can be a lot of fun as well. Ask her to sing you a song or tell you a story and she will. Ask her to set a reminder or an alarm for a certain time and she will do it flawlessly. That being said, I just don’t use Cortana that often. I think if I didn’t have to pick up my phone to use her that she would be a whole lot more useful.

A Beautiful Mobile OS
The more I have used my Windows Phone the more I have fallen in love with it. The more I want the platform to succeed. I think the OS is absolutely stunning. I love the minimalist look of all the applications. Many of the third-party application developers are good at keeping this minimalist look. I don’t feel like I am ever very far from anything that I need. The transitions are crisp, even on a low powered device like the Lumia 635 that I have. Everything is as smooth as butter. Yes, I know that is a phrase that gets way too often, but when on TechButter…!

I highly recommend that if you’re interested, watch for sales. Often you’ll see the Lumia 635 go on sale for $40. Pick it up just to experience something different. Give it to a kid later to use as a camera or portable music player if you don’t like it. The Lumia 640 is also out there. The extra 512 MB of RAM will definitely help out. If you can get it for a good deal, I do recommend it based on my experience with the Lumia 635.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom

Last month (May 2007) I wrote a blog entry about Aperture. At the time I was house sitting for my sister who had just got a new iMac. When I came home I was disappointed that I didn’t have a similar application to use for working on my photos. Last fall I had played with the Adobe Lightroom Beta and it was extremely slow on my computer so I didn’t really give it much thought. Then I decided to download the trial and give it a shot anyways after thinking that it might actually perform better now that I have a dedicated graphics card with 128MB of memory instead of the motherboard’s integrated GPU which only had 32 MB of RAM allocated to it. The following will be my thoughts of Lightroom and I will be comparing a lot of it’s features with the experience I had with Apple’s Aperture.

Features I Really Liked

When you first open Adobe Photoshop Lightroom you are asked where you want to import images from. You can choose to import images from your camera or from a location on your computer. Once you choose and your images have been imported they are placed into the Library. You’ll also probably want to change the view from “Loupe View” to “Grid View.” This will allow you to see all of the images that you just imported. Also, it’s easier to go ahead and rotate your images from this view before you get to adjusting the images. Once you do get your images rotated and you are ready to start adjusting them, click on an image that you want to work on and then click on Develop, this is where all the adjustments will take place.

When you’re in the “Develop” mode there are a lot of adjustments that you can make. The first adjustment that I usually make is the white balance, exposure and contrast. Lightroom has a few pre-programmed presets for adjusting tone curve and this is what I usually use because they seem to work pretty well for me. If you find yourself applying the same adjustments to more than one or two images you can create additional presets.

The next adjustments that I make are of the colors. This is my favorite feature and one that really makes Aperture and Lightroom worth their pricetags. My camera doesn’t do a great job of applying saturation to images, which is acceptable in some instances because the camera might apply too much and it would be hard to correct in post processing. I usually find myself increasing the saturation of blues to make skies bluer and greens to make leaves much more vibrant. If the color you see is a bit odd from what you remember seeing you can change it’s hue and luminance.

I want to talk a little bit more about the lighting adjustments that you can make using Lightroom. You can use the tone curve tool or you can use sliders to adjust the lightness or darkness of highlights, dark areas, light areas and shadows. You’d be surprised by just how much better you can make an image look by slightly tweaking the tone curve.

An adjustment that I find myself needing quite frequently is a sharpening tool. Lightroom’s got one and you don’t have to add it to the panels every time you open a new image like I did in Aperture but, I have never seen any difference when I have used this tool. I don’t know whether it’s so subtle I just don’t see a change or if my monitor just isn’t all that great. What I’ve been doing is when I’m finished with the photo I export it out and sharpen it up in an external editor.

When you have finished editing the photo and are satisfied with it you can add a star to it. You can add 1-5 stars to each image. I usually apply a 5 star rating to images that I’m going to export and upload to Flickr. There is also a feature that let’s you add images to a “Quick Collection.”

If you’ve got multiple images of the same thing and you need to compare them Lightroom has you covered there as well. The only downside to Lightroom’s comparison feature is that you can only compare one photo at a time.

In addition to the comparison tool Lightroom has a tool that I really like called “Before & After.” I really like to use this to see just how much better my images are once I’ve adjusted the lighting, saturation, etc.

Another great feature of Lightroom that most good photo editing applications are incorporating these days is non-destructive edits. Like I mentioned in the Aperture review, it is really nice to be able to make changes to images and a year later come back and still have the original images. You’ll want to make backups of course, which is built into Lightroom, but, every good photo editing application will have this.

I am happy to say that cropping images in Lightroom is much easier than it was in Aperture. At least the figuring out how to do it part. When I was using Aperture it took me a while to figure out how to crop an image, in Lightroom it was much easier to understand. What I really liked about Lightroom is that when I cropped an image and made changes to the image, if I zeroed the image out the crop would stay. I thought that was really nice.

What I Was Not So Happy With

Lightroom is resource intensive. I know I don’t have the most powerful computer on the planet, but still, it’s resource intensive. I couldn’t use the application if my computer’s display was running at 1280×1024, I’d have to decrease to 1024×768. I had to close out of all other applications that I was running. Even running Skype and Lightroom at the same time would cause my computer to lockup. Even with closing all applications Lightroom still isn’t very fast, sliders occasionally become unresponsive and images take their precious time loading. You really need a modern computer to use Lightroom effectively, something faster than my AMD Athlon XP 1700+, 128 MB GPU and 1 GB of RAM.

Features I Would Like To See

If you need to see what your image looked like before you applied an adjustment you can use the history panel. In my opinion it’s not as nice as Aperture’s ability to hide an effect by clicking on a hide icon beside of the adjustment.

Another feature that I really miss from Aperture is full screen editing. You can hide panels very easily in Lightroom, too easily sometimes, but it doesn’t compare to being able to edit an image in full screen mode. I really miss that and hope to see it in Lightroom soon.

Like I mentioned previously, in my opinion the sharpening tool does not do anything for images. I’d like to see this corrected. Also, I’d like to see some sort of tool to go along with the sharpening tool so you can further define where you want to apply the sharpening to.

Final Thoughts

Although Lightroom is missing a lot of things that I really liked when I was using Aperture, I think Lightroom is a great piece of software. It’s only at Version 1.0 at the moment so I’m sure better things are to come. If you’re needing photo editing software and you’re on Windows, I would highly recommend Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. If you’re using a Mac, I’d recommend sticking with Aperture. Both Lightroom and Aperture are $299, which in my opinion is a bit steep. However, it is cheaper than buying a copy of Adobe Photoshop and both applications are much easier to work with than trying to learn how to edit your photos in Photoshop.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom

Aperture Review

Last night I was chatting with my friend Steve and he mentioned that I should install the Aperture trial. I thought it was a great idea so I did and here are my “first look” thoughts.

When you first start up the application you have several options to get started. You can import your photos or one of the best things about the first launch that I like is the fact that they have provided quick start tours. What I hate about these quick start tours is that you have to access them online.

As you would expect from an Apple product, importing your photos is easy. However, the image import process seemed a lot slower than it does when I import photos through iPhoto or manually off of the memory card. My guess would be that when the photos are imported, EXIF data and a lot of other information is determined about the photo instead of waiting until you actually open the file. That is my guess.

As I patiently waited for my images to import I looked around the application and liked what I saw. The application appears to have a lot of features but they didn’t clutter the application up with a ton of icons and make it hard to understand. Once my photos had imported I was playing around with my photos in no time.

The first image that I opened and started playing with I wanted to sharpen the image up a bit. It took me a little while to find the tool to do it. I had to add a panel to the adjustments panel. Once I did, I was impressed. Not only did I use the sharpen feature to sharpen up the image but there was also a way to adjust the radius of the sharpen effect. I was extremely impressed. The image I was working with was a little out of focus but that feature really improved the image. I used this technique on several other photos and it really brought out parts of the image that would otherwise go unnoticed.

The technique above works really well and really makes a lot of my images look so much better. The only problem with this is that every time you open a new photo to edit you have to add the sharpen panel to the screen again. Annoying. I also don’t see anywhere to make this a standard option.

The next thing that I am completely in love with is the fact that when you are in full screen mode, looking at your images, you can move the toolbars around. You cannot do this in iPhoto or Picasa, which is what I primarily use on my PC at home. Although this feature may seem like a small one, it’s definitely a great feature for me when you are looking at portrait type images where the main focal point of the scene is at the bottom. Also, you can add the panels for adjusting your photos while you are in full screen mode.

As you are working with the images you can un-check the check box beside each adjustments panel to hide those effects. It’s really nice to not have to undo each effect just to see what it looked like previously.

When I got to the point where I wanted to crop an image I was a little bit confused as how to crop the image. I knew to go to the toolbar item at the top and to select the area of the image that I wanted to keep. The problem is, I didn’t understand how to apply that effect. Finally, I clicked on the pointer icon in the toolbar and that applied the crop. Although it’s simple once you figure it out, it takes a little while to figure out.

When I first launched the application I really did not feel as though this application was necessary, for me. To me, it simply looked like an expensive application to organize and do some more advanced changes to a photo than you can in iPhoto. However, I have been playing with Aperture the past few hours and I have noticed that there are a lot of changes I can make to an image, a lot of subtle changes especially, that make the photo a whole lot better.

A feature of Aperture that is a truly must have for any photo organization/manipulation tool is to not overwrite the original images. Using Picasa I have had this feature for a while now and would not want to have it any other way. It’s really nice to be able to make changes to an image and then a year later come back and still have access to the original files.

Where Aperture really shines is the RAW support. Taking RAW photos gives you the ability to adjust virtually every detail of a photo. The camera takes a picture of what it sees without adding any effects or adjustments to the saved image. Once you pull the images from the camera you add the sharpness, color saturation, exposure, etc.

iPhoto has RAW support but it’s very limited in what you can adjust. Aperture on the other hand gives you tons of options for adjusting your photos. You can take an image that was a little too bright when it was captured and make it a little darker, more saturated and sharp to enhance the beauty of the image. Aperture will truly show you the reasons an image captured in RAW format is so much better because you can truly make it an impressive photograph.

If you are like me when you take photos you’ll wind up pulling 10 or more (ok, usually a lot more than 10) images off of your camera of the same thing. For me this ensures that I get a great image. Most photographers do this as well. Usually if I take more than one photo of the same thing I reduce the risk of someone’s eyes being closed or sometimes they’ll be slighty turned in one photo and you didn’t really think about them being turned that way but it turned out really well and you’re glad you took more than one. Aperture really helps out in this. You can add stars to your images. You can add 5 stars to perfect images and 1 star to a poor image.

Another way Aperture helps out in the multiple photos department is stacking. Aperture looks at your photo collection and groups similar photos together. This allows you to easily see the different groups of photos so you can easily find the image you are looking for. I was really impressed with how well Aperture was able to separate the images where I had simply moved the camera to a different angle but not separate images that the camera was still in the same location but moved slightly due to the simple fact that I was holding the camera freestyle.

If you’ve ever used Picasa or a similar photo editing application, you’ve probably tried to increase the saturation of the colors in your images but if you went too far you’d get a lot of little blue splotches. Instead of increasing the saturation of colors overall which is how most other photo editors increase color, with Aperture you can increase a specific color. Aperture doesn’t pull out every single color of your image but it does have a palette that allows you to choose a basic color then you can increase or decrease that color. This is something that you would typically only be able to do with Photoshop or a similar application.

Aperture has so many features, I’ve barely scratched the surface. It’s a great application and I have had a lot of fun with it. The images that I have edited using the software look absolutely fantastic (even if I say so myself). They look a whole lot better than anything I could have done using what I currently use, which is Google’s Picasa. The final question boils down to this, “Is it really worth the $299 price tag?” To answer that question I would have to say yes. I’d say yes especially if you cannot afford Adobe Photoshop. Aperture gives you so many tools to make your images look great and makes it really easy to do. Even though this application has tons of tools for editing RAW images, the other photo editing tools are great for even a point and shoot camera. The non-destructive editing feature of this application alone is a major plus. I haven’t really mentioned the great photo and project organization capabilities. There are a lot of features! I’ve had a lot of fun with it and hopefully, someday, I can afford a copy of it!

Apple Aperture

Article update: Wednesday, October 8, 2008: Since the original writing of this post Apple has released Aperture 2. I have updated this post with screenshots from that version.

I’m happy to report that Aperture 2 is a whole lot better. What Apple got wrong in the first version has been corrected in this version. I think that Aperture 2 is definitely a lot better than Adobe Photoshop Lightroom. If you’re on a Mac I would definitely recommend Aperture over Lightroom.

Apple re-arranged the application. The problem with the sharpening panel and the cropping I mentioned above has been fixed. Both are more accessible than in the previous version.

Convert Nucleus CMS Blogs to WordPress

I am wanting to convert my blogs that are running on Nucleus CMS to WordPress, there are several reasons why and first of all, I want to explain why and then I will tell you how to do this:

The first and major reason I am wanting to switch is because I do not feel as though my blogs are getting enough visitors. One reason I feel this is happening is because when a search engine spiders my blogs they are not able to index my posts. From my understanding this has to do with the URL scheme for permalinks that Nucleus uses, it’s too complicated. In the Nucleus CMS forums there are tutorials for how to change the way articles are linked, however, I have been completely un-sucessful with them.

There are more features in WordPress than in Nucleus and I am wanting them now, I don't want to have to wait on future versions. The development of Nucleus seems to have slowed down, tremendously. Features I am wanting that WordPress has out-of-the box right now:

  • Static pages
  • Password protection
  • Multiple categories
  • Better SPAM prevention
  • Easier blog-rolling or linking.
  • Dashboard that shows you news in the WordPress community as well as notifications when someone links to your site.

When you upload images using Nucleus CMS it creates a proprietary link instead of linking to the image. This is especially annoying for me because when I do convert to WordPress, I am going to have to update each post so that the images will actually work!

There are other reasons that I don't like Nucleus CMS. There are reasons why I like it. However, I seriously believe it is time for me to make the switch to WordPress CMS. If nothing else, just so I can get more visitors coming to this website! At least, I hope that will happen! So, here is how we do this!

  1. Backup your Nucleus CMS database! If something goes wrong, you might have problems accessing your site.
  2. Install fresh copy of WordPress 1.5. This is an older version of WordPress, however, the converter that we are going to use does not like the newer version of WordPress. Once we get the Nucleus CMS database imported into WordPress 1.5 we can upgrade to the latest version (currently 2.04).

    WordPress Archive Directory
    WordPress Version 1.5 (ZIP)

  3. Download the converter that we are going to use and then upload into a directory on your web server. Nucleus ConverterYou can see the original documentation for the converter here.
  4. Make sure you have available the username and password of both your Nucleus & WordPress databases. Also, make sure that your Nucleus database doesn't have a prefix. If it does, you'll need to write down what the prefix of the database is.
  5. Navigate to the converter script that you uploaded to your site.
  6. Plug in the fields and click on convert.

Your posts should now be converted into WordPress, at least, this worked for me. Now, make sure you upgrade to the latest version of WordPress and then you can start cleaning up your WordPress blog. Unfortunately, you'll have to edit individual posts and re-link your images.

If you have uploaded images to your nucleus installation you can download them from the media directory, my images were under “nucleus/media/1”. I plan to upload the images to another directory and then re-link each one. If there is a simpler solution that I come up with, I will update this post.

I had multiple blogs on my Nucleus installation and what I am planning to do is to turn each of those blogs into its own category in the new WordPress installation. I need to move a couple of blogs into their own installation. I'm hoping I can either come up with a way to export individual blogs or once they are converted, export into a new install and delete the posts I don't want. If anyone has a simple way to do this, please, let me know!

Also, I should note that when I did this I also installed a fresh copy of Nuclues onto my local server, just in case something went horribly wrong.